×
×
homepage logo

TCHS Set For Ham, Bacon, Egg Sale

By Staff | Mar 9, 2016

MIDDLEBOURNE – Leon Ammons looks forward to 66th Tyler Ham, Bacon and Egg Sale that takes places Thursday at Tyler Consolidated High School.

“We encourage people to come to support the students’ hard work in preparing these products,” said Ammons, a longtime TCHS agricultural sciences teacher.

The pre-sale buyers’ reception begins at 5:30 p.m. and the auction starts at 6:30 p.m. The following items will be auctioned off to the highest bidder: 75 smoked country-cured hams, 75 smoked country-cured giant portions of bacon, 10 dozen farm fresh eggs and 10 loaves of homemade bread. The Tyler Star News will provide extensive coverage of the event in its next edition.

Ammons explained a little bit about the process that takes a pig from a pen to an auction about nine months later. He said during the summer, a student will purchase a feeder pig, which weighs between 50 and 60 pounds, and raise that animal to a full-grown hog.

“They’ll raise these pigs at their homes by feeding, watering and learning all the responsibilities needed to take of these animals,” Ammons said.

Ammons said if the conditions are right, a pig can gain three pounds a day from a high protein diet so that by November, that animal may easily weight more than 300 pounds.

Unlike the classic novel”Charlotte’s Web”, there is no spider spinning webs to save a pig named Wilbur from his fate. TCHS Future Farmers of America President Lacey Seckman said though she has spent countless hours raising the pig, she doesn’t have any reservations about sending it to the slaughter house.

“Of course, I’ve spent time with the pig, but animals are put on this earth for us to use as food,” said Seckman, whose family owns a farm with cattle.

Ham may be sold for $18 a pound, while bacon typically sells for $35 a pound. Students may use the proceeds from the auction for their future academic endeavors in college.

“We always like to see how much this year’s sales will improve from last year,” said Casey Miner, TCHS agricultural sciences teacher.